¡Adios, Señora Gotliffe!

Se%C3%B1ora+Gotliffe
Back to Article
Back to Article

¡Adios, Señora Gotliffe!

Señora Gotliffe

Señora Gotliffe

Maura Fennelly

Señora Gotliffe

Maura Fennelly

Maura Fennelly

Señora Gotliffe

Maura Fennelly, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Madison High School’s World Language department has been lucky enough to have four decades with one of the most remarkable Spanish teachers of all time. Señora Gotliffe has led hundreds of students to success by helping them understand the Spanish language. Although Spanish was never my forte, I had the pleasure of taking Spanish 3 with Señora Gotliffe my junior year, and nearly a week into school I realized why this teacher is spoken so highly of. Upon hearing of her retirement, I  (MDO) decided to interview her (SG) to find out what exactly her time at MHS has been like.

MDO: When did you decide to retire?

SG:  The time was approaching. November was finally the time to break the news.

MDO: How many years have you been teaching?

SG: Forty years!

MDO: What are some of your fondest memories at MHS?

SG: Of course the Fennelly family [Editor’s note: Gotliffe had the privilege of teaching my father and two uncles], a situation in which a bat flew through a window and shattered it during an attempt to break a piñata, and breaking up a fight between two boys in the cafeteria.

MDO: What changes have you experienced at MHS?

SG: Everything has become digital, digital, and more digital. Everything became influenced by technology. Students used to use those empty phone booths in A Hall to make calls. When I first came here people used typewriters…and chisels.

MDO: Do you still keep in contact with students you have taught in years past?

SG: Yes, students contact me for help in college. A lot of students have become Spanish teachers or use the language in their jobs.

MDO: Are there certain classes you have taught that were very significant to you?

SG: Students that I have taught for more than one year are usually a part to a good class. The dynamic between the students and I make for a good class.

MDO: What do you plan on doing during your retirement? And where do you see yourself in ten years?

SG: I’ll be traveling hiking, eating good food, and reading. Hopefully in ten years I won’t be dead! Ten years ago I didn’t think I would be retiring now.

MDO: What is one last word of advice you would like to give to the students of MHS?
SG: Find work that you love, and do it.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email