Malala Yousafzai: A Winner in Our Hearts

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Malala Yousafzai: A Winner in Our Hearts

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Girls in School

Quinn Hurley, Writer

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Most kids in high school have many uncertainties in their life, not knowing what job they want to have, what beliefs they have, or even what they’re doing this weekend. Unlike many teens, Pakistan native Malala Yousafzai makes worldwide news frequently with her strong beliefs in women’s rights for education as a 16 year old. Starting at only 9 years old, Malala stood up for women’s education under a strict rule of the Taliban in Pakistan, getting noticed by countries including the United States. Last year she again made international news when she was shot in the head by the Taliban, who condemned her work for equal education rights for women. Having suffered a very traumatic experience she could have stepped down from the spotlight, but she did the opposite. She since then has been featured in Time’s “Most Influential People in the World” yearly issue, written a book called “I Am Malala”, and has given a speech about the need for education improvements at the prestigious UN.

Malala’s already extraordinary life at 16 years old seems to amaze people everyday. Having just passed the anniversary of her near death experience, this year has been a huge success for Malala. Due to this near tragedy, many predicted she would win the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013. It seemed right that she would win the prize almost exactly a year after her shooting, showing that she made more than a full recovery. Even after much support from powerful people all over the world, on October 11, 2013 it was announced that the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) had won following efforts to remove dangerous chemical weapons from harm.

Although the Nobel Peace Prize committee received criticism after not awarding Malala, she took the loss gracefully and congratulated the OPCW for their win. Even without the prize it doesn’t seem like the end of Malala’s education activism is soon.

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