“It” Movie Review

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Madeleine McNamara

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“It” Movie Review

Movie poster

Movie poster

Google Common License

Movie poster

Google Common License

Google Common License

Movie poster

On September 8, 2017, the newest adaption of Stephen King’s It hit theaters and instantly became a massive success.  It grossed over $123 million during the first week, and earned a rating of 87% on Rotten Tomatoes. Based on Stephen King’s 1986 novel, the movie follows a group of awkward young teens, known as the Losers’ Club, in Derry, Maine.  An evil being in the form of a creepy clown referred to as “It” by the seven teens, preys on them and other children in their town every 27 years.

Although the movie falls into the horror category, It explores themes of family, friendship, the importance of bravery in the face of danger, and humor.  Through the young characters, there is a comedic element as they joke and exchange “put downs”.  It is a very well-rounded movie that has an exciting plot, and lets the audience feel a strong connection to each individual characters.  Although It does contain a fair share of gore with a boy’s arm being bitten off, and people being stabbed and beaten with rocks, It is not a typical horror movie whose sole purpose is to gross out the viewer.  There is also a focus very serious issues including an abusive father and a hypochondriac mother who thrives on her child being ill.  

The characters’ fears in It are also not stereotypical horror movie fears of monsters popping out at them.  The clown, Pennywise, transforms into what each victim fears the most, and then he feeds on them.  The characters’ fears range from traumatic events to personal experiences.  For example, one of the character’s worst fears is the memory of his parents dying in a house fire.  Another character is a germophobe and his biggest fear is being accosted by a leper. The character development is so strong that the audience grows to care about each of the kids, and suffer their greatest fears along with them.

At the end of It, the audience is only left with wanting more and a scary sequel is sure to come, taking place 27 years after the events of the movie.