Book Review: Anatomy of a Single Girl by Daria Snadowsky

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Book Review: Anatomy of a Single Girl by Daria Snadowsky

Georgia Turvey

Cover of Anatomy of a Single Girl

Georgia Turvey, Writer

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Though not a literary masterpiece, Anatomy of a Single Girl by Daria Snadowsky is still a book worth reading. Though the book is a sequel, the plot is still easy to follow, even if one has not read the first book in the series. The story follows the path of Dominique, a Floridian teen in her first summer back from college. Dom, as she is nicknamed in the book, is still getting over her first big breakup.

The book presents itself as a bit of a caricature. The dialogue is often unrealistic and readers may be turned off by Dom’s dramatic approach towards life. Yet once the reader gets past these shortcomings, there is legitimate value in the book. Snadowsky tackles young romance with a realism not often found in novels of the genre. Sex is not presented as something glamorous or perfect and the book in no way idealizes it.  This allows Snadowsky to discuss sex in a way more relevant to the reader. The book teaches girls to remember their own wants and not to lose themselves in a relationship.  It discusses the importance of safe sex and different methods of birth control.  I found myself very impressed with Dom’s ability to leave relationships that are no longer good for her. Though at the beginning of the book, Dom is very lost after her breakup, her recovery reminds readers that they cannot let their happiness be dependent on another person. Her ability to grow from her breakup instead of letting it define her is yet another example of the many lessons Snadowsky shares.

There is a lot to be gained in this book. It serves as an honest discussion about relationships for young women, yet it never preaches to its readers or comes across as condescending. Though the writing style may leave readers unimpressed, the message of the book compensates for its literary shortcomings.

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